Allo' Expat Bolivia - Connecting Expats in Bolivia
Main Homepage
Allo' Expat Bolivia Logo


Subscribe to Allo' Expat Newsletter
 
Check our Rates
   Information Center Bolivia
Bolivia General Information
 
History of Bolivia
Bolivia Culture
Bolivia Cuisine
Bolivia Geography
Bolivia Population
Bolivia Government
Bolivia Economy
Bolivia Communications
Bolivia Transportations
Bolivia Military
Bolivia Transnational Issues
Bolivia Healthcare
Bolivia People, Language & Religion
Bolivia Expatriates Handbook
Bolivia and Foreign Government
Bolivia General Listings
Bolivia Useful Tips
Bolivia Education & Medical
Bolivia Travel & Tourism Info
Bolivia Lifestyle & Leisure
Bolivia Business Matters
  Sponsored Links


Check our Rates

Culture & People
 
 
 

General

Bolivia is a country in South America located at the Andes mountains. It has a Native American population which mixed Spanish and West and Central African cultural elements with their ancestors' traditions. The Spanish-speaking population mainly follows the Western customs.

The cultural development of what is present-day Bolivia is divided into three distinct periods: pre-Columbian, colonial and republican. Important archaeological ruins, gold and silver ornaments, stone monuments, ceramics and weavings remain from several important pre-Columbian cultures. Major ruins include Tiwanaku, Samaipata, Incallajta and Iskanwaya. The country abounds in other sites that are difficult to reach and hardly explored by archaeologists.

The Spanish brought their own tradition of religious art which, in the hands of local indigenous and mestizo builders and artisans, developed into a rich and distinctive style of architecture, painting and sculpture known as "Mestizo Baroque." The colonial period produced not only the paintings of Perez de Holguin, Flores, Bitti, and others but also the works of skilled, but unknown, stonecutters, woodcarvers, goldsmiths and silversmiths. An important body of native baroque religious music of the colonial period was recovered in recent years and has been performed internationally to wide acclaim since 1994. Bolivian artists of stature in the 20th century include, among others, Guzman de Rojas, Arturo Borda, Maria Luisa Pacheco and Marina Nunez del Prado.

Clothing

It is fashionable among Bolivian Andean women of indigenous descent to wear a skirt called a pollera. It was originally a Spanish peasant skirt that the colonial authorities forced the indigenous women to wear. Now it is also a symbol of pride in being indigenous and is also considered a status symbol.

Another fashion is the bowler hat, which was adopted from the British. The position of the hat can indicate a woman's marital status and aspirations.

Festivals

Pagan rites from the pre-Columbian era are still common during the religious festivals of the Indians. The clothing used during the festivals reminds the visitor of the pre-Columbian Indians and the 16th century Spaniards. The devil dances at the annual carnival of Oruro are amongst the great folkloric events of South America, as are the lesser known indigenous Anata Andina and the "carnival" at Tarabuco (Pujllay) or the Tinku-fertility rites held at Macha every 3rd May.

Music

Out of all the Andean countries, Bolivia remains perhaps the most culturally linked to the indigenous peoples. Like most of its neighbours, Bolivia was long dominated by Spain and its attendant culture. Even after independence, Bolivian music was largely based on European forms. In 1952, a revolution established nationalistic reforms which included cultural and political awareness of the Aymara and Quechua natives. Intellectuals in the country began wearing ponchos and otherwise associating themselves with native cultures, and the new government promoted native folklore by, among other methods, establishing a folklore department in the Bolivian Ministry of Education.


See more information on the next page... (next)


 

 
 
   



 


copyrights © AlloExpat.com
2015 | Policy